Monthly Archives: May 2015

Technological unemployment is not inevitable: How innovation creates new jobs

The relationship between technology and employment has long been a subject of debate. Technological change has contributed to the decline in manufacturing and to persistent unemployment in many advanced economies. This development is not inevitable, claims Marco Vivarelli from the … Continue reading

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Consumption loans: Breaking the cycle of hunger in Zambia

Small-scale farming remains the primary source of income for the vast majority of the rural population in Zambia, with typically low levels of productivity and farming income. During the hungry season (January to March), farmers who can’t get access to … Continue reading

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Should colleges share the burden of student loan debt?

Tertiary education is a costly thing. How to design its financing is a major topic in public policy. Around the world, very different policies have been implemented – from tuition-free education in Germany, and interest-free loans reimbursed after graduation in Australia, … Continue reading

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Innovative approach to reduce violence and crime in Liberia: New research supported by DFID and IZA

Cities are home to more than half the population of developing countries. Many cities struggle to deal with large-scale urban violence, crime, and drugs, especially among poor young men. In post-conflict and fragile states, poor young men are also targets … Continue reading

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What happens to student applications when university tuition fees go up?

By Filipa Sá (King’s College London and IZA) The coalition government’s increase of university tuition fees in England in 2012 has led to lively debates on how the cost of higher education affects university applications, particularly for students from disadvantaged … Continue reading

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Interview: Costs and benefits of emigration from West Africa

Held in Dakar, Senegal, this year’s Annual Migration Meeting (AM²) acquired a tragic topicality: The ongoing loss of lives in the Mediterranean Sea makes migration from Africa to Europe one of the most pressing policy challenges at the moment. Tomorrow … Continue reading

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IZA Fellow Alan Barrett appointed to become ESRI Director

The Council of the Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI, Dublin) has announced that Alan Barrett will succeed Frances Ruane later this year as the Director of the Institute. Alan Barrett is currently the Head of the Economic Analysis Division … Continue reading

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